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What Does a Scaffolder Do?

What Does a Scaffolder Do?
By MegaInterview Company Career Coach

Scaffolding is a temporary structure that is used to support workers while they perform tasks at heights, such as building or repairing buildings, bridges, and other structures. A scaffolder is responsible for erecting and dismantling scaffolding and inspecting and maintaining it to ensure it is safe for use.

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In this article, we will explore the role of a scaffolder and the responsibilities they undertake as a part of their job. We will also discuss the education and training requirements for becoming a scaffolder and the career outlook for this profession.

Whether you are considering a career as a scaffolder or simply want to learn more about this important role in the construction industry, we hope this article will provide valuable insights and information.

Scaffolder Duties and Responsibilities

Scaffolders are skilled tradespeople who are responsible for erecting and dismantling scaffolding, as well as inspecting and maintaining it to ensure it is safe for use. Some of the specific duties and responsibilities of a scaffolder may include the following:

  • Reading and interpreting blueprints, plans, and other technical documents to determine the type and size of scaffolding required for a job
  • Erecting scaffolding using hand and power tools, such as hammers, wrenches, and drill guns
  • Inspecting scaffolding for damage or defects and performing repairs or maintenance as needed
  • Ensuring that scaffolding is set up according to safety standards and regulations
  • Providing guidance and instruction to other workers on how to use scaffolding safely
  • Monitoring the work area for hazards and taking appropriate precautions
  • Coordinating with other team members and supervisors to ensure that scaffolding is set up and dismantled efficiently
  • Maintaining accurate and organized records of scaffolding inspections and maintenance

Scaffolders may also be responsible for other tasks, such as preparing estimates for scaffolding projects and ordering supplies and equipment.

They may work in a variety of settings, including construction sites, industrial plants, and warehouses.

Scaffolder Job Requirements

To become a scaffolder, individuals must meet certain job requirements. These requirements may vary by employer but generally include the following:

Scaffolders typically require a high school diploma or equivalent, although some employers may prefer or require post-secondary education or vocational training. On-the-job training is typically provided for entry-level scaffolders.

In terms of experience, it may vary depending on the employer, but some scaffolders may have several years of experience working in construction or other related fields.

As for certifications and licenses, it may vary depending on the location and employer. But generally, scaffolders may be required to have certifications demonstrating their proficiency in scaffold safety and construction techniques, as well as OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) certification. Some states or municipalities may also require scaffolders to have a license to work in the area.

Scaffolder Skills

There are several job skills that are required for a scaffolder position, including:

  • Physical stamina: Scaffolders must have good physical stamina, as they may be required to lift heavy objects and work in physically demanding positions.
  • Hand-eye coordination: Scaffolders must have good hand-eye coordination in order to manipulate tools and materials accurately and safely.
  • Manual dexterity: Scaffolders should have good manual dexterity, as they will be handling tools and materials on a regular basis.
  • Problem-solving skills: Scaffolders must be able to think critically and solve problems in order to identify and resolve issues with scaffolding.
  • Communication skills: Scaffolders should have good communication skills, as they will be working with a team of other scaffolders and may be required to provide instructions or guidance to other workers.
  • Teamwork skills: Scaffolders should be able to work well in a team environment, collaborating with other scaffolders and supervisors to complete projects efficiently.
  • Attention to detail: Scaffolders must be detail-oriented, as they will be responsible for ensuring that scaffolding is set up and dismantled correctly and safely.
  • Safety awareness: Scaffolders should be aware of safety standards and regulations and be able to identify and mitigate hazards in the work environment.

Scaffolder Salary

The salary and job outlook for a scaffolder can vary depending on factors such as location, experience, and industry. According to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the median annual wage for scaffolders is $53,480. Scaffolders who work in specialty fields, such as oil and gas extraction, may earn higher salaries than those working in other industries.

The BLS projects that the employment of scaffolders will grow faster than the average for all occupations between 2020 and 2030. This growth is expected to be driven by an increasing demand for construction and repair services, as well as the need to maintain and upgrade existing infrastructure. Scaffolders are expected to play a critical role in meeting this demand, as they are responsible for erecting and dismantling the scaffolding that is used in construction and repair projects.

Overall, the job outlook for scaffolders is expected to be favorable, with good opportunities for employment in the construction industry and other sectors that rely on scaffolding. However, competition for scaffolder positions may be strong, especially in areas with a high demand for construction services.

Scaffolder Work Environment

The work environment for a scaffolder can vary depending on the specific setting in which they work. Scaffolders may work in a variety of settings, including construction sites, industrial plants, and warehouses.

In general, scaffolders work outdoors and may be exposed to inclement weather and other outdoor elements. They may also work indoors, depending on the project. Scaffolders often work at heights and may be required to use fall protection equipment, such as harnesses and lanyards.

Scaffolders may work long or irregular hours, including evenings, weekends, and holidays, depending on the project and the employer. They may also be on call, meaning they are available to respond to emergency repairs or other urgent needs outside of regular working hours.

The work environment for scaffolders can be physically demanding, as they may be required to lift heavy objects and work in awkward or confined positions. Scaffolders may also be exposed to hazards such as falls, slips, and trips, and should be prepared to take appropriate precautions to prevent accidents and injuries.

Overall, the work environment for a scaffolder can be challenging, but it can also be rewarding, as scaffolders play a vital role in the construction and repair of buildings and other structures.

Scaffolder Trends

There are several trends that are currently impacting the field of scaffolding, including:

  • Increased demand for construction and repair services: The construction industry is expected to continue to grow, driven by factors such as population growth and the need to maintain and upgrade existing infrastructure. This trend is expected to lead to more job opportunities for scaffolders.
  • Use of technology: Scaffolders are likely to encounter more advanced technologies in their work, such as computer-aided design (CAD) software, 3D printing, and drones. Scaffolders should be prepared to learn and use these technologies in order to improve efficiency and productivity.
  • Safety regulations: Scaffolders must adhere to strict safety regulations in order to prevent accidents and injuries. The trend towards increased safety regulations is expected to continue, and scaffolders should be prepared to follow new rules and guidelines as they are introduced.
  • Sustainability: There is a growing trend toward sustainable and environmentally-friendly construction practices, and scaffolders may be required to use materials and methods that are more sustainable.
  • Specialization: Some scaffolders may choose to specialize in a particular type of scaffolding or work environment, such as oil and gas extraction or petrochemical plants. Specialization can lead to increased job opportunities and may result in higher salaries.

How to Become a Scaffolder

To become a scaffolder, individuals must meet certain education and training requirements. The specific steps to becoming a scaffolder may vary by location but generally include the following:

  • Earn a high school diploma or equivalent: Most employers require scaffolders to have a high school diploma or equivalent.
  • Complete on-the-job training or an apprenticeship: Scaffolders typically receive on-the-job training from experienced scaffolders or through apprenticeship programs. Training may include classroom instruction, as well as hands-on experience building and dismantling scaffolding.
  • Obtain certification: Some states and employers require scaffolders to be certified, which may involve completing a training program and passing a written exam. Certification may be offered by trade unions, professional organizations, or other entities.
  • Meet legal requirements: Scaffolders may be required to have a valid driver’s license and pass a background check and drug test. In some states, scaffolders may also be required to be licensed or registered in order to work legally.
  • Gain experience: Scaffolders who have experience in the field may be more likely to find job opportunities and advance in their careers. Some scaffolders may choose to specialize in a particular type of scaffolding or work environment in order to gain additional experience and expertise.

Overall, becoming a scaffolder requires a combination of education, training, and experience. Scaffolders should be prepared to work hard and continuously learn in order to succeed in this field.

Scaffolder Advancement Prospects

The advancement prospects for a scaffolder can vary depending on the specific company or industry in which they work. In general, scaffolders who demonstrate strong skills, knowledge, and a willingness to learn and improve continuously can have good advancement prospects within their organizations.

In some cases, a scaffolder may be able to advance to a higher-level position within their organization, such as a team lead or supervisor. These roles often involve additional responsibilities and may require additional education or training.

In other cases, a scaffolder may choose to pursue additional education or training in order to qualify for more advanced roles within their field or to transition to a different field altogether. For example, a scaffolder with a background in scaffolding may choose to pursue additional education or certification in order to qualify for roles as a construction manager or safety manager.

Overall, the advancement prospects for a scaffolder will depend on their individual skills, qualifications, and ambition, as well as the specific opportunities available within their organization or industry.

Scaffolder Job Description Example

Job Description: Scaffolder

Position Summary:

We are seeking a skilled and motivated scaffolder to join our team. The scaffolder will be responsible for erecting and dismantling scaffolding, as well as inspecting and maintaining it to ensure it is safe for use. The scaffolder will work with a team of other scaffolders and will be expected to follow all safety guidelines and regulations. The scaffolder will report to the construction supervisor and will be responsible for ensuring that scaffolding is set up and dismantled efficiently and safely.

Key Responsibilities:

  • Read and interpret blueprints, plans, and other technical documents to determine the type and size of scaffolding required for a job
  • Erect scaffolding using hand and power tools, such as hammers, wrenches, and drill guns
  • Inspect scaffolding for damage or defects, and perform repairs or maintenance as needed
  • Ensure that scaffolding is set up according to safety standards and regulations
  • Provide guidance and instruction to other workers on how to use scaffolding safely
  • Monitor the work area for hazards and take appropriate precautions
  • Coordinate with other team members and supervisors to ensure that scaffolding is set up and dismantled efficiently
  • Maintain accurate and organized records of scaffolding inspections and maintenance

Qualifications:

  • High school diploma or equivalent required
  • On-the-job training or apprenticeship in scaffolding required
  • Scaffolders may be required to be certified, depending on the state and employer
  • Strong physical stamina and ability to lift heavy objects required
  • Good hand-eye coordination and manual dexterity required
  • Good problem-solving and communication skills required
  • Ability to work well in a team environment required
  • Valid driver’s license may be required
  • Ability to pass a background check and drug test may be required

If you are interested in joining our team as a scaffolder and believe you have the skills and experience to excel in this role, we encourage you to apply today.

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