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Transcriptionist vs. Captioner – What’s The Difference?

Transcriptionist vs. Captioner – What’s The Difference?
By MegaInterview Company Career Coach

Transcriptionist vs. Captioner – what are the differences? Learn everything you need to know about the differences between a Transcriptionist and a Captioner.

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Transcriptionists and captioners both have essential roles in providing a written or audio-visual record of a spoken or written text. The primary difference between a transcriptionist and a captioner is their work medium.

A transcriptionist typically works with audio and video recordings, such as interviews or lectures, to produce a written record. On the other hand, a captioner works with live audio and video, such as television broadcasts or live events, to create a text version of the spoken words.

What is a Transcriptionist?

A transcriptionist is a person who listens to audio recordings and types out spoken words into written documents. Transcriptionists are often used in fields such as medicine, law, and journalism.

What is a Captioner?

A captioner is a professional who specializes in transcribing audio into text, such as closed captioning for television and film. Captioners write captions for dialogue, sound effects, and other audio elements that appear on the screen. They may also provide descriptive audio for those who cannot hear the audio.

Transcriptionist vs. Captioner

Below we discuss the fundamental differences between work duties, work requirements, and work environment of  a Transcriptionist and a Captioner.

Transcriptionist vs. Captioner Job Duties

The roles of transcriptionist and captioner are often confused, but they are two separate professions with distinct duties and requirements. Transcriptionists and captioners specialize in converting spoken language into written words but have different focuses and job duties.

Transcriptionists listen to audio recordings and convert them into written documents. This typically includes creating transcripts for video and audio recordings, such as television shows, interviews, and medical dictations.

Transcriptionists must have excellent listening skills and a good command of the English language in order to transcribe audio recordings accurately. They should also have a strong understanding of grammar and punctuation to ensure accuracy and clarity in their work. Transcriptionists may also be responsible for editing and proofreading their work.

On the other hand, Captioners are responsible for creating captions for television shows and videos. Captioners must have a good understanding of the English language and excellent typing and listening skills. They must be able to quickly and accurately transcribe spoken words and convert them into written captions.

Captioners need to be able to watch a video or listen to an audio recording and accurately transcribe what’s being said in order to create captions that are both accurate and timely.

Conclusion

Overall, both transcriptionists and captioners are responsible for converting spoken language into written words, but the duties of these two professions are quite different.

Transcriptionists are responsible for transcribing audio recordings into written documents, while captioners are responsible for creating captions for television shows and videos.

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Transcriptionist vs. Captioner Job Requirements

Transcriptionists and captioners are both professionals who create written records of spoken words, but they work in different settings and have slightly different job requirements.

Transcriptionists typically work in medical, legal, or business settings and are responsible for transcribing audio recordings of meetings, interviews, or dictations.

Furthermore, transcriptionists must have excellent typing and listening skills, as well as a high level of accuracy and attention to detail. A high school diploma or equivalent is typically required, although some employers may prefer or require a post-secondary certificate or associate degree in medical transcription or a related field.

On the other hand, Captioners work in the media and entertainment industries and are responsible for creating captions for television shows, movies, and other video content. They must have excellent listening skills and be able to type quickly and accurately.

Captioners also need strong editing skills and the ability to work with specialized captioning software. A high school diploma or equivalent is typically required, although some employers may prefer or require a post-secondary certificate or associate degree in a related field, such as broadcast captioning.

Conclusion

In summary, both transcriptionists and captioners require strong listening and typing skills, as well as a high level of accuracy and attention to detail. However, the job requirements and required education can differ depending on the industry and specific position.

A high school diploma or equivalent is typically the minimum requirement for both positions, but post-secondary education in a related field can be preferred or required depending on the employer.

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Transcriptionist vs. Captioner Work Environment

Transcriptionists and captioners are two distinct roles that have similar job requirements. Both jobs require excellent spelling, grammar, and attention to detail, as well as the ability to use audio/visual editing software.

Transcriptionists typically work in a quiet and comfortable environment, such as an office or home office, and have more control over the work they do. They are often asked to transcribe audio recordings, videos, and even interviews, which requires them to be able to type quickly and accurately.

Transcriptionists also need to be familiar with the formatting requirements for different types of transcription work.

Captioners, on the other hand, typically work in a live environment, such as a television or radio studio. Their job is to type out a script in real time as audio or video content is being broadcast. These scripts must be precise and error-free, as they will be used on-air.

Captioners must be highly attentive and have excellent typing skills, as they must be able to quickly and accurately transcribe the audio/visual content.

Conclusion

Overall, the primary difference between transcriptionists and captioners is the type of work environment they operate in.

Transcriptionists typically work in a more controlled environment and have more time to craft precise scripts, while captioners must work in a live environment and type quickly and accurately without making any mistakes.

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Transcriptionist vs. Captioner Skills

Transcriptionists typically work with audio-only recordings, such as dictations, lectures, or interviews, and transcribe them into text format. To excel in this role, a transcriptionist needs excellent listening skills, strong typing abilities, and proficiency in grammar and punctuation. They may also need to be familiar with industry-specific jargon, such as medical terminology or legal language.

In contrast, captioners work with video content, such as TV shows, movies, or online videos, and add captions or subtitles to the footage. This requires not only strong typing skills but also the ability to time captions correctly with the spoken words on the screen. Captioners also need to have a good understanding of language and grammar and be able to work efficiently under tight deadlines.

Overall, while both roles require strong transcription skills, captioners need to have additional skills such as proficiency in timing captions with the video content and working under tight deadlines. The required skills for transcriptionists may depend on the industry they work in, such as medical or legal fields, but the focus is primarily on accurate transcription of audio content.

Conclusion

In summary, while the fundamental skills of transcription are essential to both roles, the main difference lies in the type of content they work with and the additional skills required.

Transcriptionists may require a higher degree of accuracy and industry-specific knowledge, while captioners need to have the ability to time captions and work efficiently under tight deadlines.

Transcriptionist vs. Captioner Salary

Transcriptionists are responsible for accurately transcribing audio or video files into written form. They typically have a high school diploma or equivalent and may have a certificate or degree in transcription. According to PayScale.com, the median salary for a transcriptionist is $37,174.

Captioners are responsible for transcribing and timing audio or video events, such as captioning television shows, films, or other videos. They also use captioning software to synchronize text with the audio track. According to PayScale.com, the median salary for a captioner is $52,531.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the salaries for transcriptionists and captioners vary significantly, with captioners earning substantially more than transcriptionists. This can be attributed to the higher level of responsibility, skill, and experience required for captioning.

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